Last edited by Ferr
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

5 edition of The great patent medicine era found in the catalog.

The great patent medicine era

or, Without benefit of doctor

by Adelaide Hechtlinger

  • 190 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Galahad Books in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medicine, Popular.,
  • Patent medicines.

  • Edition Notes

    Selections of Americana from various books, magazines, almanacs, newspapers, etc.

    Statementby Adelaide Hechtlinger.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC82 .H43 1974
    The Physical Object
    Pagination248 p. :
    Number of Pages248
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5439877M
    ISBN 100883651130
    LC Control Number73089250

    Patent Medicine Collection Readers of this blog know that one of my passions is studying and collecting 19th-century and early 20th-century patent (aka quack, proprietary, snake oil, etc.) medicine bottles, packages, and ephemera. The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor. New York: Galahad Books. Pg. University of Washington Libraries.

    A patent medicine, also known as a nostrum, is a commercial product advertised as a purported over-the-counter medicine, without regard to its effectiveness. Patent medicines were one of the first major product categories that the advertising industry promoted; patent medicine promoters pioneered many advertising and sales techniques that were later used for other products. Patent medicine advertising often marketed products as being medical panaceas . Patent medicines reached their zenith in the U.S. in the late 19th century. As the population became more urban and affluent, a ripe target emerged for entrepreneurs who would thrive in a unregulated marketplace characterized by the dictum, 'caveat emptor'. Communications had expanded, and newspapers became important for the sale of patent.

    What was actually in Thompson's Cattle Powder, Hostetter's Stomach Bitters, or Hamlin's Wizard Oil? Prior to regulation by the FDA, over-the-counter medicine in this country was largely a creation of small businesses. There was a large variety of so-called "patent medicine," each a proprietary blend of - what? The term "patent medicine" has nothing to do with being issued a patent. The Era of the embossed cure was relatively short. Beginning in the early s, medicine makers, in response to the ever growing competition, turned to more outrageous means to attract public attention. The word "Cure" increasingly appeared as part of the advertising spiel through the next four decades.


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The great patent medicine era by Adelaide Hechtlinger Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor Hardcover – January 1, by Adelaide Hechtlinger (Author)Cited by: 3. The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor by Adelaide Hechtlinger.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking “The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor” as Want to Read: Want to Read.3/5.

About this Item: Galahad Books, NY. Medicine, patent medicine, pills, powders, elixer, Folk Medicine The story of American Folk Medicine from the end of the Civil War until when Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act. very good, fon, dust jacket taped.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users/5. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hechtlinger, Adelaide.

Great patent medicine era. New York: Galahad Books, [?] c (OCoLC)   The Great Patent Medicine Era: Or, Without Benefit of Doctor. New York: Galahad Books.

University of Washington Libraries. Increased government regulation brought about the end of the patent medicine era. In Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, with the strong support of President Theodore Roosevelt. Although patent medicines continued to be produced after that date, new, stricter regulations demanded that ingredients be printed on labels, false claims.

A patent medicine, also known as a proprietary medicine or a nostrum (from the Latin nostrum remedium, or "our remedy") The great patent medicine era book a commercial product advertised to consumers as an over-the-counter medicine, generally for a variety of ailments, without regard to its actual effectiveness or the potential for harmful side earliest patent medicines were created in the 17th century.

The era of patent medicine—which stretched from the 17th into the 20th century and was especially prolific in the United States and England—was a response to the shortcomings of medicine.

Get this from a library. The great patent medicine era; or, Without benefit of doctor. [Adelaide Hechtlinger] -- Selections of Americana from various books, magazines, almanacs, newspapers, etc.

The Great Medicine Show In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, “patent medicine” became very popular for a variety of aches, ailments, and diseases. Often sold by traveling salespeople in what became known as “medicine shows,” these many decoctions were often sold with colorful names and even more colorful claims.

Med Instrum. Sep-Oct;11(5) The great patent medicine era. Roth N. PMID: [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Publication Types:Cited by: 4. Medicine, Popular. Patent medicines. Contents.

Books to aid afflicted. Parts of the body. Home remedy books. Indian doctor's dispensatory. The Indian doctor. Passions and sex. The guide board. Health and disease. Book advertisements. Almanacs of patent medicines. Labels of old patent medicines.

Sears & Roebuck. Aphrodisiacs. Electricity. The Great Patent Medicine Era; or, Without Benefit of Doctor. New York: Galahad Books, 7. "History of Patent Medicine." Made in Minnesota: Patent Medicine on the Prairie, in the classroom.

It offers discussion questions, classroom activities, and primary source analysis tools. It is intended to spark pedagogical creativity by giving a. The series had a huge impact and was published as a book in 2 The book begins, Gullible America will spend this year some seventy-five millions of dollars in the purchase of patent by: 2.

In the latter decades of the 19th century the larger proprietary medicine companies formed a national association primarily for the purpose of protecting their interests against impending legislation concerning their products.

This group called itself by the name of The Proprietary Association of America. Members included well known names in the patent medicine business. Samuel Hopkin's Adams series,The Geat American Health Fraud published in Collier's Magazine in opened the door to passage of the first U.S.

Pure Food and Drug Act. The first article in the series exposes the cozy relationship between the press and patent medicine concerns.

Patent medicine promoters pioneered many advertising and sales techniques. Patent medicine advertising often touted exotic ingredients, even if their actual effects came from more practical elements.

The producers of many of these medicines used a primitive version of branding to distinguish themselves from their many competitors.

The great patent medicine era: Or, Without benefit of doctor Biochemistry Units for the High School Biology Teacher Similar Authors To Adelaide Hechtlinger. The first of these was Ayer’s Cherry Pectoral, which became one of the most popular products of the patent medicine era.

Though marketed as a remedy for everyone, it was also specifically advertised for children, and claimed to cure several dangerous afflictions such as whooping cough, tuberculosis, and influenza, as well as asthma and. James Harvey Young recounts in his book The Toadstool Millionaires the editor of Colliers, Norman Hapgood, became so affronted by the fraud and effrontery of the patent medicine business, that he decided on a major campaign to expose them.

He sought out a reporter capable of digging out the facts and writing a hard-hitting full scale exposure of medical quackery.Author of The great patent medicine era, The seasonal hearth, The complete book of paper antiques, American quilts, quilting, & patchwork, Modern science dictionary., Handbook of modern experiments for high school biology, The Pelican Guide to Historic Homes and .I.

THE GREAT AMERICAN FRAUD. Reprinted from Collier's Weekly, Oct. 7, This is the introductory article to a series which will contain a full explanation and exposure of patent-medicine methods, and the harm done to the public by this industry, founded mainly on fraud and poison.